Climate Change and the 2020 Presidential Candidates: Where Do They Stand?

Climate Change and the 2020 Presidential Candidates: Where Do They Stand?

Climate change is getting unprecedented attention from the growing field of 2020 presidential candidates.  These candidates are responding to the threats posed by a rapidly warming climate, the many economic opportunities in switching to clean energy and the increasing concern of the American people: according to the Yale Program for Climate Change Communication, a record 69 percent of voting-age Americans say they are worried about climate change. Almost a third say they are “very worried,” by far the highest percentage ever recorded.

This blog is designed to collect the candidates’ comments and positions on climate change and clean energy to highlight the issue’s growing salience and to provide a resource for the public. We’ll be regularly updating this post to capture additional comments as they occur and candidates as they declare.

Announced Candidates for President (in alphabetical order):

  1. Sen. Cory Booker
  2. Sec. Julian Castro
  3. Rep. John Delaney
  4. Rep. Tulsi Gabbard
  5. Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand
  6. Sen. Kamala Harris
  7. Gov. John Hickenlooper
  8. Gov. Jay Inslee
  9. Sen. Amy Klobuchar
  10. Rep. Beto O’Rourke
  11. Sen. Bernie Sanders
  12. Pres. Donald Trump
  13. Sen. Elizabeth Warren

Candidates Exploring a run for President:

  1. Mayor Pete Buttigieg
  2. Gov. William Weld

Announced Candidates

Sen. Cory Booker

BioBooker is the former mayor of Newark, N.J., and the state’s junior senator.

RolloutBooker’s announcement video did not include any references to climate, opting instead to focus on civil rights and economic justice messaging.

  • Booker co-sponsored Sen. Ed Markey’s Green New Deal resolution, saying:

“Climate change is a pressing and serious environmental and economic crisis that threatens the way of life for our kids and grandkids. This challenge must be met with a commitment from the federal government that is commensurate with the level of commitment we saw in this country during the original New Deal. And that’s exactly the type of determination this proposal brings. Communities of color, low-income communities, indigenous communities and our family farmers are on the front lines of climate change, and I’m particularly encouraged that this blueprint addresses climate change in a way that promotes both economic and environmental justice.”

“We are at a really difficult point in human history. Scientists now are coming to a consensus around the planet that if we allow temperatures to rise to a certain level it could have catastrophic impact – literally trillions of dollars hits to our economy, the most vulnerable people suffering. And doing nothing is not an option right now because our planet is in peril. And so the question now is what is the United States of America going to do? Is it going to lead the planet, in terms of dealing with this crisis? Or is it going to pull back from global leadership when we are the biggest economy on planet earth? I believe that America should lead and it should lead boldly. And so the Green New Deal is this bold idea that we need to lean in to do something about climate change and we need to start taking dramatic efforts to invest in green energy and not let other countries beat us to the jobs of the future and the green technology. We should make sure that our communities get jobs doing those things, and make sure that the federal government… make sure that there’s job opportunities for folks.

History:

  • Booker was one of the first prospective candidates to support a Green New Deal, tweeting his support on December 14, 2018: “We must take bold action on climate change & create a green economy that benefits all Americans…. Excited to support a #GreenNewDeal.”
  • He was one of three co-sponsors on Jeff Merkley’s 100 by 50 Act in 2017.
  • Booker has argued in the past for expanding nuclear power (nuclear power provides over a third of New Jersey’s energy). NRDC experts Dale Bryk and Jackson Morris wrote about why nuclear is the wrong approach to reducing emissions and how best to approach transitioning away from it here.

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Sec. Julian Castro

BioCastro is the former mayor of San Antonio and served as Housing and Urban Development Secretary under President Obama

Rollout

  • When Castro announced his candidacy on January 12, he made addressing climate change a key point in his speech:

“The biggest threat to our prosperity in the 21st century is climate change. Don’t let anybody tell you that we have to choose between growing our economy and protecting our planet. We can fight climate change and create great jobs in America. And here’s the thing: we don’t have a moment to waste. Scientists say that if we don’t get serious about this right now the consequences will be tragic.

So we won’t wait. As president, my first executive order will recommit the United States to the Paris Climate Accord. We’re going to say no to subsidizing big oil and say yes to passing a Green New Deal.”

History:

  • As mayor of San Antonio, Castro pushed the local utility to shut down a 900-megawatt coal-fired power plant and to adopt a 20 percent renewable energy benchmark by 2020.

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Rep. John Delaney

BioThe former U.S. representative for Maryland’s 6th congressional district, Delaney was the first Democrat to announce his candidacy for president. He is a wealthy businessman who was one of the richest members of Congress during his tenure.

Rollout:

  • Delaney has made his support of a carbon tax one of his key platforms. After announcing his run for president he was one of the original co-sponsors of the Energy Innovation and Carbon Dividend Act of 2018, which NRDC experts David Doniger and Derek Murrow profiled here. In November he appeared on MSNBC to promote the bill, and upon being asked how climate change will feature in his presidential bid, he said “It’s a huge focus…. When I’m president I’m going to make sure we [pass a bill] just like this.”
  • “Putting a price on carbon is the most effective tool we have to tackle the massive threat of climate change,” he said in a press release in January. “A carbon tax will change behavior, spur massive new innovation in clean energy, and produce dividends that can be returned directly back to people.”
  • In a recent visit to New Hampshire, Delaney poured cold water on the Green New Deal Resolution:

“I actually don’t think the Green New Deal is the way to go. The reason is that I want to do something about fixing climate change tomorrow. I don’t want to tie it to fixing health care…. If you tie climate change to universal healthcare then you’re actually making it five times harder to do anything on climate change!”

History:

  • Delaney twice introduced the Tax Pollution, Not Profits Act (2015, 2017), a carbon tax bill that would have invested revenue in assisting displaced coal workers and lowering the corporate tax rate. In 2016, Delaney filed a resolution alongside Senator Ben Cardin calling for the US to produce 50% of its electricity from carbon-free sources by 2030.

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Rep. Tulsi Gabbard

BioGabbard is an Iraq War veteran and former vice chair of the Democratic National Committee who currently serves as the representative for Hawaii’s 2nd congressional distric

Rollout:

  • Gabbard’s rollout focused almost exclusively on an anti-interventionist foreign policy, though at one point during her announcement video she says “We have people in positions of power who are not thinking about the wellbeing of our people and the planet.” In her kickoff speech she mentioned the need to “stand up against those that pollute our land, our water, and our air.”

History:

  • Gabbard has been one of the most outspoken voices for climate action in the House, sponsoring the “Off Fossil Fuels for a Better Future Act” in 2017 which aimed to transition the country to 100 percent clean energy by 2035. In a press release when the bill was introduced, Gabbard said, “We must do all we can to end our addiction to fossil fuels and deploy the technologies that will put America on the path toward a clean, sustainable energy future today and in the years to come…. If the federal government does not act now and bring people together to solve this challenge, we will fail to protect future generations of Americans from the devastating economic and environmental consequences of climate change.”

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Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand:

Bio:

Gillibrand is the junior senator from New York and was formerly the representative from New York’s 20th congressional district.

Rollout:

  • Gillibrand has positioned herself as an environmental champion. In her announcement video, after flashing video of Donald Trump calling climate change “a hoax”, she shows photos of Sunrise Movement youth activists and says “We launched ourselves into space and landed on the moon. If we can do that we can definitely… pass a Green New Deal.”
  • In an interview with Jon Favreau on “Pod Save America” several days after announcing her exploratory committee, she said she supported a Green New Deal. “I think we need a moonshot,” she explained. “We need to tell the American people we are going to have a green economy in the next 10 years not because it’s easy but because it’s hard…. If you actually invest in wind turbines, in solar panels, in geothermal, in hydropower, in biofuels, if you use our ability to innovate and invent you will solve the problem of moving into a green energy economy. And by doing that you’re going to create a lot of jobs.”
  • She also added “I think you should put a price on carbon if you really want to attack global climate change effectively. You should put a price on carbon because what you’re doing is you’re incentivizing good behavior. You’re saying “If you want to be a polluter – fair enough, but you’re going to pay a lot more because you’re harming the rest of us and we’re going to have to pay all those hospital bills.”… you don’t get the benefit of being a big polluter unless you’re gonna pay for it. But if you’re going to be the inventor and the innovator who’s going to create the new energy efficient processes you get the benefit.”
  • Several days after that interview, Gillibrand sent a letter asking Environment and Public Works Committee chair John Barasso (R-WY) to hold hearings and consider legislation “designed [to] decarbonize our economy and get us to net-zero emissions by as close to 2050 as possible. This should include a mix of innovative solutions in transportation policy, climate-smart infrastructure and high-performance energy efficiency.”
  • Gillibrand co-sponsored Senator Markey’s Green New Deal resolution, saying:

“Climate change is real, it threatens us, and the evidence is now irrefutable that if we don’t act immediately to stop it, then our land, our water, our air, and our lives will all be upended in potentially catastrophic ways. There will be no going back. I urge my colleagues: Rise to this challenge, prevent the catastrophe, and pass a Green New Deal that protects and strengthens our country in this new, uncertain era. We can end the climate change crisis, we can dramatically modernize our economy, and we can create countless new jobs across the entire country that can’t be shipped overseas – but we can only do it if Congress seizes this opportunity and acts now, instead of wasting more time arguing about whether or not the problem is even real. We cannot wait another day. I urge all of my colleagues to fight with me for a Green New Deal that puts Americans to work to solve this extraordinary challenge.”

History:

 

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Sen. Kamala Harris

BioHarris, the former district attorney for San Francisco, served as California’s attorney general before being elected to the US Senate.

Rollout:

  • Harris made little mention of climate change in her announcement speech in Oakland. However, the next day at a CNN Town Hall in Iowa, when asked whether she supported the Green New Deal she responded by saying:

“I support a Green New Deal and I will tell you why. Climate change is an existential threat to us and we’ve got to deal with the reality of it…. we have policymakers who are in the pocket of big oil and big coal who don’t fully appreciate the fact that we are looking at something that is posing an existential threat to our country.” “I know what we need to do… around investing in solar, in wind,” she added. “The Bureau of Labor Statistics just came out in the middle of last year with a list of the top 20 jobs in the United States for which we’re going to see the greatest amount of growth…. Number one and number two on that list: installation and maintenance of wind turbines and solar paneling…. That’s what a Green New Deal has to include, that’s what we have to be about…Listen, all children need to be able to breathe clean air and drink clean water. We’ve got to have a commitment to a policy that will allow that for ourselves and for our children and our grandchildren, and right now we don’t.

  • Harris co-sponsored Senator Markey’s Green New Deal resolution, saying:

“Climate change is an existential threat, and we must deal with the reality of it. We must radically shift the conversation on how to address the climate crisis we are facing because we are running out of time to act. I am proud to be an original co-sponsor of this bold Green New Deal resolution and look forward to working with my colleagues to craft policies to protect our environment, create jobs to fuel a clean economy, and build a sustainable and equitable future.”

History:

  • Harris introduced the “Living Shorelines Act of 2018,” which would have directed the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration to make grants to communities to combat the impacts of sea-level rise and stronger storms. As attorney general, she launched an investigation into whether Exxon Mobil lied to the public and its shareholders about the risks posed by climate change.

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Gov. John Hickenlooper

BioHickenlooper is the two-term former governor of Colorado. He previously spent time as a geologist for a petroleum company.

Rollout:

  • In his campaign announcement video, Hickenlooper touches on the impact climate change has had on Colorado during his time as governor. “Historic drought, thousands of acres in flames, and then came the worst floods in a hundred years…. I promised Colorado families that we would rebuild our communities better than before…With a divided legislature, we brought environmentalists and oil and gas companies to the table to create the toughest methane emissions laws in the country.”
  • In a post-announcement interview with George Stephanopoulos on Good Morning America, Hickenlooper said, “Ultimately I’m running for president because I believe that not only I can beat Donald Trump, but I’m the person who can bring people together on the other side and get stuff done…. When I was mayor [of Denver] I got all 34 [suburban] mayors, two-thirds of them Republicans or conservative Independents, 34 mayors to universally support the largest transit initiative in the history of the country. We called it FasTracks, 122 miles of new track. I mean that’s how you address climate change! Creating groups of people that are committed – forget about Republican and Democrat…. We’re the one place where this has gotten done, and I think it’ll work in Washington.”

History:

  • In 2017 Hickenlooper signed an executive order requiring his state to cut greenhouse gas emissions 26% below 2005 levels by 2025. He also signed Colorado up to the U.S. Climate Alliance and has helped turn Colorado into a national leader on electric vehicles.
  • He has defended fracking to produce natural gas. At an event on June 14, 2018, co-hosted by E2, Hickenlooper claimed natural gas was going to be essential for helping lift people around the world out of poverty, and he lauded his administration’s efforts to curb fugitive methane emissions. After getting environmentalists and oil and gas companies together, “The oil and gas industry agreed to pay $60 million a year [to plug leaks] and they took the equivalent of 300,000 cars off the road.” Overall, he said, “I think what we’re going to see is… a large percentage of new energy being wind and solar, renewable energy, but I think we’re still going to need a lot of natural gas for a while.”

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Gov. Jay Inslee

BioInslee is the Governor of Washington State. He formerly served as a member of the U.S. House of Representatives for Washington’s 1st Congressional District from 1999 to 2012.

Rollout:

Inslee’s announcement video focused exclusively on climate change. After showing archival footage of him talking about climate change on the House floor, Inslee tells the camera,

“We’re the first generation to feel the sting of climate change. And we’re the last that can do something about it. We went to the moon and created technologies that changed the world. Our country’s next mission must be to rise up to the most urgent challenge of our time: defeating climate change. This crisis isn’t just a chart or a graph anymore, the impacts are being felt everywhere. We have the opportunity to transform our economy, run on 100% clean energy, that will bring millions of good paying jobs to every community across America, and create a more just future for everyone. I’m Jay Inslee, and I’m running for president because I’m the only candidate that will make defeating climate change our nation’s number one priority. We can do this, join our movement! This is our moment.”

Inslee’s formal announcement was held at a solar panel installation facility in Seattle, and there he outlined the four main goals of his platform:

  1. Number one, we will power our economy with 100 percent clean, renewable, and carbon-free energy and achieve net zero greenhouse gas pollution in the United States.

  2. Number two, we are going to create millions of good paying jobs in every community investing in clean energy. We are going to build electric cars in Michigan. We are going to build and install wind turbines in Iowa. And we are going to install  solar right here in Washington State. That’s what we’re going to do.

  3. And while we do this, we will focus on justice and inclusion as a centerpiece of this economic transformation, to ensure no group is left to bear the cost of transition and everyone benefits from new jobs and investment.

  4. And finally we need to end the giveaways and billions in subsidies to fossil fuel industries.

History:

  • Inslee is a co-founder of the U.S. Climate Alliance, a bipartisan coalition of 21 states that have pledged to take action on climate change following Trump withdrawal from the Paris climate agreement.
  • Inslee has been at the forefront of calls for the next president to prioritize climate change. In an op-ed in the Washington Post on January 17th Inslee wrote, 

“The Democratic Party must nominate a candidate who will put fighting climate change at the top of the agenda. And that’s why I’m seriously considering running for president….

Confronting this change has been the driving force of my time in public life. About a decade ago [in 2007], I co-wrote a book about the need to transform our economy to one run on clean energy and the need for a national Apollo mission-style project to take on this herculean task.

As governor of Washington, I’ve seen firsthand what’s possible when you invest in clean energy — reducing carbon pollution and supporting family-wage jobs that are growing twice as fast as those in any other industry…. to win a national mandate for action everywhere, we must nominate a candidate who will deploy clean energy and cut carbon pollution on the ambitious scale required, even if it means deferring other worthy goals.

This will be hard. The oil companies, the big polluters and the climate deniers are incredibly powerful. They will do everything they can to protect their profits.

But our next president must summon the full energies of our nation to realize what the science is demanding of us. We must strive to achieve net-zero carbon pollution by midcentury, create a 100 percent clean-energy grid, and deploy new strategies and massive investments to transition off fossil fuels and decarbonize transportation, buildings and industries.”

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Sen. Amy Klobuchar

BioKlobuchar is the senior senator from Minnesota.

Rollout:

  • In her announcement speech on February 11, Klobuchar promised that “in the first 100 days of my administration I will reinstate the clean power rules, the gas mileage standards, and put forth sweeping legislation to invest in green jobs and infrastructure. And on day one, we will rejoin the international climate agreement.”
  • On February 12th, Klobuchar told Anderson Cooper that “I’m in favor of (the Green New Deal) simply because I see it as a framework to jump-start a discussion… I don’t see it as something that we can get rid of all these industries or do this in a few years — that doesn’t make sense to me — or reduce air travel. But what does make sense to me is to start doing concrete things, and put some aspirations out there on climate change.”

History:

  • After the release of the IPCC’s 1.5 degrees report in October, Klobuchar took to the floor of the Senate and gave a speech on the importance of addressing climate change and reducing greenhouse gas emissions.
  • Following the release of the National Climate Assessment in November, Klobuchar spoke with George Stephanopoulos on ABC’s “This Week” and called for a renewed commitment to the Paris climate agreement, decried the Trump administration’s rollback of gas mileage standards, and called for the use of EPA authority to regulate greenhouse gases.
  • Klobuchar co-sponsored Senator Markey’s Green New Deal resolution, saying: “Investing in clean green energy is our future. We must do it for our climate and we must lead in the world.”

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Rep. Beto O’Rourke

Bio: O’Rourke is the former representative of Texas’ 16th district. He ran for Senate against Ted Cruz and lost narrowly.

Rollout:

  • In his announcement video on March 14, O’Rourke told the camera that “the interconnected crises in our economy, our democracy, and our climate have never been greater.” He adds “perhaps most importantly of all, because our very existence depends on it, we can unleash the ingenuity and creativity of millions of Americans who want to ensure that we squarely confront the challenge of climate change before it’s too late.”
  • At a campaign event in Keokuk, Iowa that same day, O’Rourke was asked for his thoughts on the Green New Deal. “This is our final chance,” he responded. “The scientists are absolutely unanimous on this, that we have no more than 12 years to take incredibly bold action on this crisis…. Can we make it? I don’t know, it’s up to every single one of us…. Some will criticize the Green New Deal for being too bold, for being too unmanageable. I’ll tell you what, I haven’t seen anything better that addresses the crisis that we face, a crisis that could at its worst lead to extinction…. Literally the future of the world depends on us right here.”

History:

  • O’Rourke told reporters at a march in El Paso in February that Markey and Ocasio Cortez’ Green New Deal Resolution “is the best proposal that I’ve seen to ensure that this planet does not warm another two degrees celsius, after which we may lose the ability to live in places like El Paso…. it is on all of us — not just Congress and the president, but everyone in this country — so that we all do everything we can to get the specific laws and regulations at the federal, state, and local levels to match that commitment, as well as harnessing the ingenuity and innovation that comes from this great country to match that challenge.”

“The climate is changing. Man-made climate change is a fact…. We still have time, but the window is closing. If we’re going to make our commitment to the generations that follow and not just think about the next election or our political career or our pursuit of the White House then we can make the right decisions.

Now, we can support Texas being a proud energy leader in oil and in gas, but also in renewable energy. Today, Texas leads the country – we’re number one in the nation – in the generation of renewable wind power. We’re number five and moving up quick when it comes to solar. The two fastest growing jobs in the United States of America today [are] wind and solar jobs. We can continue to grow this economy, we can reject the false choice between oil and gas and renewable energy, make sure we produce and refine and transport and use our energy resources more responsibly.”

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Sen. Bernie Sanders

BioSanders is the junior senator for Vermont. He ran a longshot campaign for the Democratic presidential nomination in 2016 against Hillary Clinton, ultimately receiving 46% of delegates at the national convention that year.

Rollout:

  • In a video posted on February 19 in which Sanders announced his candidacy for president, he listed climate change as one of his reasons for running:

“Our campaign is about transforming our country and creating a government based on the principles of economic, social, racial and environmental justice….

I’m running for president because we need to make policy decisions based on science, not politics. We need a president who understands that climate change is real, is an existential threat to our country and the entire planet, and that we can generate massive job creation by transforming our energy system away from fossil fuels to energy efficiency and sustainable energy.”

History:

  • In 2015 Sanders joined Senators Merkley and Markey to introduce the “American Clean Energy Investment Act,” which would have made permanent tax credits for clean energy, incentivized energy efficiency upgrades and expanded access to electric vehicles.
  • Sanders co-sponsored Sen. Merkley’s “Keep It In the Ground Act” in 2015 and 2017 and his “100 by 50 Act” in 2017.
  • During the 2016 campaign, Sanders backed a national ban on fracking.  
  • On December 3, 2018, he held a virtual town hall on “Solving Our Climate Crisis” that featured noted environmental leaders such as Bill McKibben, Van Jones, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, and Republican mayor Dale Ross, who successfully transitioned his town to 100% renewable energy.
  • Sanders co-sponsored Senator Markey’s Green New Deal resolution. He wrote on Twitter saying:
  • “Climate change is an existential disaster facing the entire world. We must transform our energy system away from fossil fuels to energy efficiency and sustainable energy. A Green New Deal can save the planet and create millions of new jobs.”

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President Donald J. Trump

Bio: Trump is the 45th president of the United States. Prior to his election in 2016, Trump was a  hotelier, real estate developer and reality TV show personality. He is currently under investigation by federal authorities regarding multiple matters related to his businesses and his 2016 campaign.

Rollout:

  • Trump filed for re-election mere hours after his inauguration and officially launched his campaign on February 27, 2018. He has repeatedly dismissed the scientific consensus about climate change, claiming he has a “natural instinct for science.”
  • He recently told reporters that he doesn’t believe the findings from the U.S. 4th National Climate Assessment, produced by his own administration, which reinforced the scientific consensus that climate change is largely caused by human activity and warned of the dire consequences of continuing to emit greenhouse gasses at current levels.
  • He told the Washington Post later that “a lot of people like myself — we have very high levels of intelligence, but we’re not necessarily such believers [in climate change]. You look at our air and our water, and it’s right now at a record clean.”

NRDC’s Bob Deans has written at length about the environmental damage Trump and his administration have produced. Both NRDC (Trump Watch) and National Geographic have also kept a detailed timeline of all his administration’s changes to environmental policy, including air and water pollution deregulation and rollback of Obama era climate rules.

History:

Trump has questioned the science behind climate change for years on his personal Twitter account:

 

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Sen. Elizabeth Warren:

BioWarren is the senior senator from Massachusetts.

Rollout:

  • While climate didn’t figure prominently in Warren’s exploratory committee announcement video. in the days afterward, her campaign told Axios that “Senator Warren has been a longtime advocate of aggressively addressing climate change and shifting toward renewables, and supports the idea of a Green New Deal to ambitiously tackle our climate crisis, economic inequality, and racial injustice.
  • When she announced her candidacy for president, Warren said “When it comes to climate change, our very existence is at stake. But Washington refuses to lift a finger without permission from the fossil fuel companies. That’s dangerous and it’s wrong!… Stop stalling on spending money, real money, on infrastructure, on clean energy and a Green New Deal!”
  • Warren co-sponsored Senator Markey’s Green New Deal resolution, saying, “If we want to live in a world with clean air and water, we have to take real action to combat climate change now. I’m proud to join Senator Markey and Rep. Ocasio-Cortez on a Green New Deal resolution to fight for our planet and our kids’ futures.”

History:

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Candidates Exploring a Run

Mayor Pete Buttigieg

Bio:

Buttigieg, the mayor of South Bend, Indiana, is the first millennial (he’s 37) and openly gay candidate for president in history. He made his foray into national politics by running for Chair of the Democratic National Committee in 2017.

Rollout:

  • In his presidential rollout, he told The Atlantic that “If you’re my age or younger… you’re going to be dealing with climate change for most of your adult life in specific, noticeable ways.” He went on, saying that “It just gives you a very different relationship to political decision makers and decision making.”
  • On February 10th, Buttigieg told Jake Tapper that he endorsed the Ocasio-Cortez/Markey Green New Deal resolution. “I think it’s the right beginning,” he said. “The idea that we need to race toward that goal and that we should do it in a way that enhances the economic justice and level of opportunity in our country, I believe that is exactly the right direction to be going in.”

History:

  • In 2018, Buttigieg committed South Bend to the Global Covenant of Mayors for Climate & Energy. “We are already seeing the effects of climate change on our residents and businesses,” Buttigieg said about the announcement. “We joined the Covenant because we are serious about ensuring South Bend is a healthy, prosperous place for the next several generations, and because we want South Bend to contribute to the global effort to protect the climate.”

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Gov. William Weld

Bio:

Weld is the former Republican governor of Massachusetts. He was Gary Johnson’s running mate on the Libertarian presidential ticket in 2016.

History:

  • At a speech announcing his exploratory committee for president at St. Anselm College in New Hampshire, Weld had this to say about climate change:

“With respect to the environment and climate change, the approach of the current administration is antithetical to every principle of conservation and conservatism, and every tenet of Theodore Roosevelt’s Grand Old Party. Whether it’s as protection of a fragile ecosystem or as stewardship of God’s creation, take your choice, there’s a pressing need to act on climate change. The United States must rejoin the Paris climate accords and adopt targets consistent with those of other industrialized nations. We must protect our economy, yes, but we must also recognize that increased natural disasters and unfamiliar weather patterns actually threaten to strip the snow from our white mountains and to melt all the mountain glaciers worldwide upon which hundreds of millions of people depend for their only water supply. Europe has its cathedrals and monuments. We have our mountains, canyons, valleys, rivers and streams, and we had damn well better take care of them. Our borders are safe here in New Hampshire, but it’s not a stretch to say if climate change isn’t addressed our coastlines and those of all other countries will be obliterated by storm surge and the melting of the polar ice cap. Yet climate skeptics claim that they are conservative!”

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In addition to these announced and potential candidates, the following people are being mentioned as possible candidates and we will post their comments and positions about climate change if and when they enter the presidential race.

  1. Sen. Michael Bennet
  2. Former Vice President Joe Biden
  3. Gov. Steve Bullock
  4. Rep. Eric Swalwell

Photo: Joe Crimmings